Thursday Thoughts: Charleston

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Tears of heat stream down my face, as I once again watch my President, an African-American father of two, speak on the grave indecencies that have, once again, befallen members of his race.

The news of the Charleston travesty is still fresh. The rage, hurt, and confusion doing back flips in my heart and mind are intensified the more after watching President Barack Obama recount the events which occurred at a prayer meeting last evening in Charleston, South Carolina. There is a slight stoop in his posture, his eyes are downcast, a small feeling of defeat radiates from his being as he tells us about the need for gun control, about the inequalities so apparent in our country today, about the lives still being lost due to ignorance, privilege, vigilantes and bigots.

What can we do? What can be done? In a world, where a white woman believes she can carry the title of African-American woman for ten years and believe she is “trans-racial,” where do we stand? Is “The Dream” only a dream and nothing more? Have we, the nation, moved forward, or were just enough bread crumbs and rights afforded to a minority of people to keep us quiet and content. Was there an expiration on our rights and privileges? Did the powers at be proclaim, “When a black man holds the seat of power, as the leader of the free world, time will be up. If they didn’t ‘get’ everything they wanted, tough luck?”

Being cynical and suspicious are not words I use to describe myself. But this doubt cannot be suppressed. These questions are yearning for answers. I have no idea how to go about finding them, but I’ll start on this little old blog, and hopefully we can find the answers together.

M.

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Tuesday Thoughts

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“No one can tell you what lies ahead, least of all those who remain behind. One thing, however, they can assure you of is that it’s not a round trip. Try, therefore, to derive some comfort from the notion that no matter how unpalatable this or that station may turn out to be, the train doesn’t stop there for good. Therefore, you are never stuck– not even when you feel you are; for this place today becomes your past. From now on, it will only be receding for you, for that train is in constant motion. It will be receding for you even when you feel that you are stuck…So take one last look at it, while it is still its normal size, while it is not yet a photograph. Look at it with all the tenderness you can muster, for you are looking at your past.”

Margaret Bradham Thomas, Charleston: A Novel